How to make OO the standard

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How to make OO the standard

Stewart Bill

This message is meant to be forwarded to Oracle management.

I'm sure by now we've all heard about MS taking a shot at OO.  Criticism
is good, it makes us better.  The surefire way to win is to simply
address the issues and make them go away.

OpenOffice could be the world standard very quickly if it solved what
users say is the number one barrier to widespread adoption.  Slides 26
and 30 of this presentation show that the feature OO users *themselves*
most need is complete compatibility with MS formats:
http://wiki.services.openoffice.org/w/images/1/11/Renaissance-status-2009-01-30_wiki.odp

Writer and Calc have better compatibility than ever before, however they
have not yet reached the "tipping point", and Impress has many remaining
issues.  Ignore this compatibility problem, and remain a niche player.
Solve it, and very quickly win worldwide adoption.  That simple.

Additional excellent real world feedback, well worth reading:
http://www.fark.com/cgi/comments.pl?IDLink=5691592

Bill Stewart
Eseri CEO
http://Eseri.com/




--
Bill Stewart, CEO
http://Eseri.com
p: 613-796-8529
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Re: How to make OO the standard

Irné Barnard
  -------- Original Message  --------
Subject: [ux-discuss] How to make OO the standard
From: Stewart Bill <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Date: 2010-10-16 14:54:59

> This message is meant to be forwarded to Oracle management.
>
> I'm sure by now we've all heard about MS taking a shot at OO.  Criticism
> is good, it makes us better.  The surefire way to win is to simply
> address the issues and make them go away.
>
> OpenOffice could be the world standard very quickly if it solved what
> users say is the number one barrier to widespread adoption.  Slides 26
> and 30 of this presentation show that the feature OO users *themselves*
> most need is complete compatibility with MS formats:

Agreed! The major cause for OOo not being used as much as MSO is the
inconsistencies with to-and-fro formatting. And using the cop-out answer
of: "It's because M$'s files are `hidden' source." is simply not cutting
it. Whether it's true or not. The point is, 90% of businesses have MS
documents, thus they have MSO, because if they open them in OOo there's
a chance that the formatting is screwed or the formulas don't work. No
matter how many times you tell them it's M$'s fault, it doesn't make
them want to move over to the less dark-side.

IMO the Ribbon fiasco didn't kill MSO for this exact reason. There
wasn't anything they could move to. Sure there's this other office suite
which has most of the same functionality, but we open a DOC and it's all
screwed up. We send a file to one of our clients and they can't open it
... oops I didn't remember to save-as to DOC, so I sent them an ODT
instead. Their Word can't open such a thing ... without me having to
explain to them they need to install an add-on or a different app --->>>
client LOST!

About the Fark site's comments: You can see there's a lot of disparity
between users about what's easier or more usable. That is if you try to
read between the hissing against the products mentioned, never mind the
trolling. I think this is because different people have different levels
of functionality needs. As one of the commenters said, they're happy to
use Abi Word and always save to RTF files (which don't have the
formatting issues) - that tells me he/she's not using that much
formatting at all, and none of the specialized stuff such as automatic
tables, section breaks, etc. Never mind the really unheard-off stuff
such as master documents. He could have used the Windows-built-in
WordPad IMO. Then you get the commenter who prefers LaTex, well ... why
he wants a word processor to compare with a setting out "programming
language" is something I think only he can answer. Somewhere in between
lies that prevalent (yet difficult to find) "typical" user.

--
Irné Barnard